The health impact of feminism

feminismSo here is something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately. My Facebook and Twitter followers probably think I’ve recently taken up misogyny as a hobby by the number of gender-realted posts I’ve been sharing. The fact of the matter is that I’ve recently learned that my wife and I will be expecting our third daughter this Spring. I feel it is my duty as a father to honestly and thoroughly study the real experience my daughters can expect to face in today’s American society.

As a lifelong student of human movement and optimal mind-body performance, I’ve naturally noticed a few connections between feminism and health.

I don’t claim to have them all worked out yet, and it is not my style to open my mouth (or take to my keyboard) without first toiling over a subject for hours if not days. I thought I could try something different and leverage the collective wisdom of you all to work through this.

Perhaps I’m on to something. Perhaps I’m way off.

You will help me decide as I slowly sort through the literature (because it is quite scattered and usually, such unexplored ideas are researched by people who are paid to think full-time).

Let me start with this as a discussion point:

At the core of feminism is that men and women are equal. I’m all on board with this. Most strains of feminism go one step further in asserting that men and women are equal in all areas but sex chromosomes and sex organs. The logical conclusion to that assertion is that any and all inequity and disparity other than those biological certainties, is culturally constructed and therefore, should be deconstructed so that all boys and girls have equal opportunity to pursue whatever they choose.

This all sounds well and good but after a couple decades of this thinking, I think it is safe to say that we have more women working outside the home than was the norm throughout all of our post-industrial history.

So, how can more women in the workforce be a bad thing? Doesn’t this mean that more money will be coming in to the house?

Sure, but what about the cost of childcare? What about the cost of relying upon convenience foods. What about the connection between chronic conditions and processed foods? What about the price paid by the rise in divorce? Might some of the marital dissatisfaction be partially caused by the blurring of gender roles and expectations? Might there be some parameters of male happiness and fulfillment that are different from female happiness and fulfillment?

I can provide studies for the nutrition aspect of my thesis but the happiness and fulfillment aspects have yet to be explored.

I don’t want to start emotion-based pissing contests here. I want to ask a question and see if it is a reasonable line of inquiry.

As I’ve said, I’ll be sharing articles and links at my Facebook and Twitter pages. I hope we can engage in an honest discussion for the sake of raising our children with a realistic outlook on life and healthy expectations of their future.

THANKS FOR READING! IF YOU LOVE WHAT YOU’VE READ, PLEASE FOLLOW MY BLOG FOR UPDATES VIA E-MAIL. I’LL NEVER SHARE YOUR INFORMATION. I’LL ONLY SEND YOU FREE BONUS MATERIAL WHENEVER IT IS AVAILABLE. SCROLL DOWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE AND CLICK “FOLLOW”. THANKS AGAIN AND KEEP MOVIN’.

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